Book Review – The Sacrifice by Indrajit Garai

(My Rating: 3/5)

These 3 short stories by Indrajit Garai, set in France, have the theme of sacrifice running through them all. In each story the protagonists are so passionate about the responsibilities they have assumed that they are willing to sacrifice it all to achieve their goal, whether that be saving a forest or caring for a child.

Garai’s style of writing takes us to the very heart of the emotion of his characters.

The Move

Gulliame is a good man, trying to do the right thing for his son and for the legacy that has been left to him, and so it is difficult for him to sometimes see things from a different perspective.

The story is a reflection of what often happens in life – things have to sometimes reach the stage of a crisis before change can take place. Continue reading “Book Review – The Sacrifice by Indrajit Garai”

Book Review – Nemesis by Agatha Christie

(My Rating 3/5)

While the Joan Hickson Miss Marple TV series has long been a favourite of mine, this is actually the first Miss Marple book I have read, thanks mainly to my newfound interest in crime novels. I must say that I think this is one of those uncommon good adaptations of book to TV series. Continue reading “Book Review – Nemesis by Agatha Christie”

Book Review – The Sound and The Fury by William Faulkner

I haven’t, as I usually do, given this book a rating, because while I have finished reading it, I am not yet done with it! This is the most difficult book I have read and I intend to return to it again. What follows then is not so much a review as an exploration of my first impressions on reading the book for the first time. In fact, I think this is a book that must be discussed, not reviewed. And so, this ‘review’ might not even make sense to someone who hasn’t read the book! Continue reading “Book Review – The Sound and The Fury by William Faulkner”

Book Review – Kingfishers Catch Fire by Rumer Godden

(My Rating: 4/5)

Published in 1953 and set in pre-Independent India, (or perhaps just after Independence – I could not ascertain which) Kingfishers Catch Fire is about fickle, illogical and dreamy Sophie, a British lady, who after travelling around India with her two young children, as and when a new fancy struck, finally decides to settle down in a remote part of Kashmir.

She is of the firm belief that she will fit in seamlessly with the locals and that she and her family will be accepted as one of them. Of course, the reality is something quite different and this is what the novel explores. It brings into focus much of what the situation in India was, specifically the hierarchical relationships between the Indians and the British – the unspoken barriers that existed, where everyone had their place and no one questioned those places or tried to alter things. Sophie however, is an exception; she does question and does try to change things. The scenario that unfolds – what happens to this single mother of two – as portrayed through Godden’s story, is a very believable one.

The characters are very interesting and well fleshed out. Sophie is the kind to go off on a whim and make plans without examining the practicality of their execution. For example, when she is short on money and decides to settle down in rural India, she emphatically declares to her daughter- “We shan’t be poor whites. We shall be peasants.” Continue reading “Book Review – Kingfishers Catch Fire by Rumer Godden”

Book Review – The Cuckoo’s Calling by Robert Galbraith

(My Rating: 3/5)

In The Cuckoo’s Calling, which is the first of the Cormoran Strike detective series by J.K. Rowling writing under the pseudonym of Robert Galbraith, Strike is hired to investigate the apparent suicide of a supermodel who has fallen to her death from her apartment balcony in Mayfair.

I generally prefer to watch TV shows such as Midsomer Murders, Inspector Morse, Miss Marple and the like, rather than read Crime/Mystery novels, so this is a new area for me. I enjoyed it and I think it’s a good genre to intersperse my usual reading with. Continue reading “Book Review – The Cuckoo’s Calling by Robert Galbraith”

Reading Challenge 2016: Book 15 – Persuasion by Jane Austen

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(My Rating: 3/5)

I am disappointed that I am unable to give this a higher rating than 3 stars, because I thought I was really going to love this book. Maybe I just wasn’t in the right mood when I read it!

Anne Elliot, who was being courted by Captain Wentworth, was persuaded by a close family friend, Lady Russell, not to marry him, as she didn’t think it a suitable match, mainly because they came from different social backgrounds.

The book begins eight years later, when the two former lovers are brought into each other’s company once again. Now Captain Wentworth is courting someone else and Anne, wisened by the interim years, begins to examine the reasons that her relationship with him did not go any further. The reader now begins to wonder whether there is a chance that they will get back together again. Continue reading “Reading Challenge 2016: Book 15 – Persuasion by Jane Austen”

Book Review – The Thirteenth Tale by Diane Setterfield

(My Rating 2 / 5)

This is a nice book to read in a hilly, chilly, rainy place, which was exactly where I was, on a pre-birthday-long-weekend-getaway last week.

Dianne Setterfield has drawn inspiration from gothic tales to write The Thirteenth Tale and in keeping with the theme, the novel is replete with dilapidated mansions, unusual twins, hidden mysteries, ghosts and old ladies with secrets they’ve been hiding for decades. Continue reading “Book Review – The Thirteenth Tale by Diane Setterfield”

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